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that is so dishonorable as to leave this great nation. i'm leaving immediately for new york. come with me or not. >> so loyalty -- did he say damn the torpedoes? >> did he say damn the -- well, i'm looking -- [laughter] my wife has heard me say this before. the words that i used in the book seem to to me to be the liy ones, that he was actually speaking to the captain of the ship right alongside four bells, captain -- [inaudible] full speed ahead and so on. so it wasn't quite what has come down in history, but the sense of it was pretty much that. and, of course, the question i always and -- ask my students is if he might have said, damn, the torpedoes! [laughter] we may never know. >> as i quote in the book, there was a marine standing near farragut on the hartford when the tecumseh went down and the brooklyn, which was just ahead of the hartford in the line of ships, stopped at the line of torpedoes, and the whole fleet came to a stop at fort morgan who were punishing them. and that's when farragut orderlied the hartford to go ahead of the brooklyn, and the rest of the ships followed, a
and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of the envelope, it's about time you got your book out 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would but again piecing things together, "u.s. news and world report"'s, "life" magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story and the story again again of a protago
confederate flags. "the new york times" reported in that meeting that a considerable section in the seats was devoted to denouncing the 1964 civil rights act. and any review that says that the only key issues in thurmond's career for constitutionalism and national security, i don't think can be taken, i don't think that passes the laugh test. of what we all know about strom thurmond and his career. so i was disappointed that "the wall street journal" felt that this man, let a close relationship with thurmond had been employed by thurmond, he admits that in the review, but then talks about that he was the best person to evaluate the book for the readers. i thought that was disappointing. >> he had no knowledge of what was being done at the time, that edwards, that was going to be, they didn't tell you ahead of time? >> no. >> that he was going to be the person? >> no. >> you have any other papers like the new times or anything -- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it
in 1863 when he brought hartford back from recess to new york and there was a big political rally going on. they were on the stage, and lincoln was concerned particularly from george mcclellan in the 1864 campaign he was uncertain about how these other generals and add morals might react, and he was there but sort of pushed up on to the stage and he said i have no speech to get i will do my job in the water and you will do your job here. i have no political interest and he left the stage. that characteristic was valuable to lincoln as well. >> back to loyalty. >> he was the grant of the needy. >> i ask if anyone would ascribe that. what astounds me because i am afraid of ships and said he was in his thirties. this guy was in his 60s. that's a tough service and demanding coming yet he managed to be heroic and it gives us all hope. [laughter] would highlight the most i'm going to ask a few more questions but i also going to ask if you have questions this would be a good time for you to line up liking on either side of the ottilie and i see a few of that will turn to you, but while you are wa
up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his permission, he sent it to me. but he didn't send it to the world. he signed it, on the back side of the envelope he said t about time you got your book out, 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would. but, again, piecing things together, "u.s. news & world report," saturday evening, life magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story, and with the
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5